HA

Blood Pressure

Blood Pressure



Blood pressure is the force of blood against the artery walls. Blood pressure is measured by two different numbers: the systolic pressure (the heart beat), over the diastolic pressure (relaxation between beats). The measurement is written one above or before the other, with the systolic number on top and the diastolic number on the bottom. For example, a blood pressure measurement of 120/80 is expressed as “120 over 80.”



Normal blood pressure is less than 120 systolic and less than 80 diastolic.



Blood Pressure Level

(Ages 18 Years and Older)



Normal Systolic < 120

Normal Diastolic < 80



High Systolic 140–159

High Diastolic 90–99



Stage 2 Hypertension Systolic>160

Stage 2 Hypertension Diastolic >100





When the two blood pressures fall into different health categories, the higher category is used to classify ones blood pressure level. High blood pressure increases ones risk for getting heart disease and/or kidney disease. High blood pressure can also increase ones chances of having a stroke. Regardless of race, age, or gender, anyone can develop high blood pressure. It is estimated that one in every four American adults has high blood pressure. Once high blood pressure develops, it remains a health concern that needs to be managed throughout ones lifetime.



High blood pressure is dangerous because it forces the heart to work harder than in normally should to maintain the same functionality. High blood pressure increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, and can also cause heart failure, kidney disease, and blindness.



Heart disease and stroke risk factors that can be controlled are:

High blood pressure (hypertension)

Abnormal cholesterol

Tobacco use

Diabetes

Overweight

Physical inactivity



Systolic Blood Pressure



Systolic pressure is the force of blood in the arteries as the heart beats. It is shown as the top number in a blood pressure reading. High blood pressure is 140 and higher for systolic pressure. Diastolic pressure does not need to be high for one to have high blood pressure. When that happens, the condition is called “isolated systolic hypertension,” or ISH.



Diastolic Blood Pressure



Diastolic pressure is the force of blood in the arteries as the heart relaxes between beats. It’s shown as the bottom number in a blood pressure reading.



The diastolic blood pressure is an important hypertension number. The higher the diastolic blood pressure, the greater the risk for heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure. As people become older, the diastolic pressure will begin to decrease and the systolic blood pressure begins to rise. A rise in systolic blood pressure will also increase the chance for a heart attack, stroke, or kidney failure.
Blood Pressure



Blood pressure is the force of blood against the artery walls. Blood pressure is measured by two different numbers: the systolic pressure (the heart beat), over the diastolic pressure (relaxation between beats). The measurement is written one above or before the other, with the systolic number on top and the diastolic number on the bottom. For example, a blood pressure measurement of 120/80 is expressed as “120 over 80.”



Normal blood pressure is less than 120 systolic and less than 80 diastolic.



Blood Pressure Level

(Ages 18 Years and Older)



Normal Systolic < 120

Normal Diastolic < 80



High Systolic 140–159

High Diastolic 90–99



Stage 2 Hypertension Systolic>160

Stage 2 Hypertension Diastolic >100





When the two blood pressures fall into different health categories, the higher category is used to classify ones blood pressure level. High blood pressure increases ones risk for getting heart disease and/or kidney disease. High blood pressure can also increase ones chances of having a stroke. Regardless of race, age, or gender, anyone can develop high blood pressure. It is estimated that one in every four American adults has high blood pressure. Once high blood pressure develops, it remains a health concern that needs to be managed throughout ones lifetime.



High blood pressure is dangerous because it forces the heart to work harder than in normally should to maintain the same functionality. High blood pressure increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, and can also cause heart failure, kidney disease, and blindness.



Heart disease and stroke risk factors that can be controlled are:

High blood pressure (hypertension)

Abnormal cholesterol

Tobacco use

Diabetes

Overweight

Physical inactivity



Systolic Blood Pressure



Systolic pressure is the force of blood in the arteries as the heart beats. It is shown as the top number in a blood pressure reading. High blood pressure is 140 and higher for systolic pressure. Diastolic pressure does not need to be high for one to have high blood pressure. When that happens, the condition is called “isolated systolic hypertension,” or ISH.



Diastolic Blood Pressure



Diastolic pressure is the force of blood in the arteries as the heart relaxes between beats. It’s shown as the bottom number in a blood pressure reading.



The diastolic blood pressure is an important hypertension number. The higher the diastolic blood pressure, the greater the risk for heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure. As people become older, the diastolic pressure will begin to decrease and the systolic blood pressure begins to rise. A rise in systolic blood pressure will also increase the chance for a heart attack, stroke, or kidney failure.